COVID-19 Resources

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  1. The coronavirus as opportunity

    Report on Supply Chain Compliance Volume 3, Number 7. April 02, 2020  | Author: Sascha Matuszak  | Published: April 02, 2020 

    The effect of the coronavirus has revealed glaring weaknesses in the global supply chain. Chief among them is the lack of a stockpile of necessary medical supplies, caused by the reliance on one or two countries (e.g., China) for the vast majority of manufacturing, which has become untenable...

  2. AI helping to combat coronavirus

    Report on Supply Chain Compliance Volume 3, Number 7. April 02, 2020  | Author: Sascha Matuszak  | Published: April 02, 2020 

    The possibility of an overwhelming burden on health care facilities due to the coronavirus pandemic has given companies developing commercial artificial intelligence (AI) solutions an opportunity to show their quality. AI can help sort through medical files and potentially identify patients in need of critical care, or patients who may contract the coronavirus...

  3. Legal and compliance developments and the coronavirus

    Compliance Today - June 2020  | Authors: Gabriel L. Imperato, Romain Balard  | Published: June 2020 

    On January 31, 2020, in response to the COVID-19 crisis, the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) Alex Azar declared a public health emergency.[1] Following President Donald Trump’s declaration of a national emergency under the National Emergencies Act and emergency determination under the Stafford Act, the Secretary of HHS was allowed to issue waivers of certain Medicare, Medicaid, and Children’s Health Insurance Program requirements pursuant to Section 1135 of the Social Security Act.[2] As a result, on March 13, 2020, the Secretary of HHS authorized the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) to take waivers and modifications.[3] The...

  4. CMS reveals new HCPCS code for coronavirus lab tests

    Compliance Today - May 2020  | Published: May 2020 

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) announced on March 6, 2020, in a special edition of MLN Connects[1] that the agency has taken “additional actions to ensure America’s patients, healthcare facilities and clinical laboratories are prepared to respond to the 2019-Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19)...

  5. Data privacy concerns in the age of the coronavirus

    Report on Supply Chain Compliance Volume 3, Number 7. April 02, 2020  | Author: Sascha Matuszak  | Published: April 02, 2020 

    Last issue, we discussed the Italian Data Protection Authority (DPA) guidance[1] regarding the health data of employees. The DPA stated the responsibility for handling health data lies with public entities—not employers. Since then, several other DPAs in Europe have come out with guidance for companies about how to handle the movement and security of personal data. Under the GDPR, health data are considered to be sensitive. In an advisory brief sent out to organizations around the world, Cordery Compliance outlined the general stance toward health data,[2] ways in which organizations can gain consent to process the data and concerns regarding...

  6. Coronavirus having an unprecedented effect on global supply chains

    Report on Supply Chain Compliance Volume 3, Number 5. March 05, 2020  | Author: Sascha Matuszak  | Published: March 05, 2020 

    The coronavirus is now on every continent except for Antarctica, and there is still no cure for nor vaccine against the virus. The disruption the virus is causing and will continue to cause to the global supply chain has no precedent. In a commentary piece for The Wall Street Journal, Yossi Sheffi, director of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Center for Transportation and Logistics, suggests the coronavirus is having a bigger effect on the global supply chain than the outbreak of the severe acute respiratory syndrome of 2003, the Fukushima nuclear disaster of 2011, and the floods that ravaged Thailand...

  7. Seven Codes for COVID-19 Lab Tests

    Report on Medicare Compliance Volume 29, Number 17. May 04, 2020  | Author: Nina Youngstrom  | Published: May 04, 2020 

    In an MLN Matters article (SE20011),[1] CMS listed three CPT and HCPCS codes for COVID-19 testing that trigger the use of the CS modifier, but there are now seven COVID-19 tests,[2] said Chris Anusbigian, a specialist senior manager with Deloitte & Touche in Detroit. “I’m not sure if CMS has updated its edits,” she said. Hospitals are holding their claims pending clarification. The newer codes are HCPCS codes U0003 and U0004 and CPT codes 86328 and 86769. Contact her at canusbigian@deloitte.com...

  8. Cheat Sheet: Parsing COVID-19, Related Codes

    Report on Medicare Compliance Volume 29, Number 15. April 20, 2020  | Author: Nina Youngstrom  | Published: April 20, 2020 

    Deloitte Advisory developed this chart explaining how to code diagnoses for COVID-19 and (potentially) related respiratory illnesses before and after April 1. There wasn’t a specific diagnosis code for the novel coronavirus before then, so coders should use B97.29, said Leslie Slater, specialist leader for Deloitte Advisory in New York City. “As of April, we have a new code that’s specific to COVID-19,” U07.1 (see story, p. 1).[1] Contact Slater at leslater@deloitte.com...

  9. Coronavirus challenging work processes, supply chains, health care systems, and more

    CEP Magazine - May 2020  | Author: Sascha Matuszak  | Published: May 2020 

    The world has emerged as generally unprepared for a global pandemic. Certain countries, such as South Korea and Taiwan, have demonstrated an ability to mobilize health care systems and communities to contain and handle the virus, whereas other countries, such as Italy and the United States, have been blindsided by the scope of the virus...

  10. Call to arms: Coronavirus presents an opportunity to get supply chain risk management right

    Report on Supply Chain Compliance Volume 3, Number 6. March 19, 2020  | Author: Sascha Matuszak  | Published: March 19, 2020 

    There is not a media outlet in the world that isn’t carrying a story about the new coronavirus and its effects on peoples’ daily lives. A primary focus of a number of reports and articles is the effect the coronavirus is having on economic conditions[1] and, more specifically, supply chain management. The effects are indeed dramatic. Supply chains, from electronics to toys to automobiles to pharmaceuticals, are experiencing dramatic decreases in supply and demand[2] as factories go offline and consumers pare back purchases...

  11. AI applications and solutions for COVID-19

    Report on Supply Chain Compliance Volume 3, Number 8. April 16, 2020  | Author: Sascha Matuszak  | Published: April 16, 2020 

    Medical sciences-focused online news company STAT released a list of ways AI can help hospitals deal with COVID-19[1] on March 31. The guide included measures that hospitals can implement immediately, as well as solutions that health care facilities should consider installing in the future. Below are some suggestions for the hospitals, as reported by the Becker Hospital Review:[2]...

  12. COVID-19 Oversight Website to Carry Reports, Audits

    Report on Research Compliance Volume 17, Number 6. May 21, 2020  | Author: Theresa Defino  | Published: May 21, 2020 

    Pandemic.oversight.gov might not have quite the zing or simple elegance of USAspending.gov, but maybe the name will grow on research compliance officials. In the coming months, they may be spending a lot of time on this new website, created as part of monitoring efforts for the trillions of dollars in federal funds to fight COVID-19...

  13. SEC eases regulatory rules during COVID-19 pandemic

    Compliance Today - June 2020  | Author: Sascha Matuszak  | Published: June 2020 

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) made slight regulatory changes[1] that could ease the burden for publicly traded companies. The changes deal primarily with disclosures, deadlines, and certain time-consuming requirements that are changed or suspended until midsummer 2020...

  14. Force majeure provisions in light of COVID-19

    Report on Supply Chain Compliance Volume 3, Number 8. April 16, 2020  | Author: Karen Kroll  | Published: April 16, 2020 

    With the COVID-19 pandemic prompting myriad business closures, many suppliers and their customers are reviewing the force majeure provisions within their supply chain contracts. Force majeure, which translates to “superior force,” recognizes that an event that’s outside anyone’s control and unavoidable—such as a natural disaster—can make it impossible for a party to fulfill its obligations under a contract. Perhaps not surprisingly, the clause is sometimes called an “act of God” provision...

  15. Security in the time of COVID-19

    ethikos Volume 34, Number 5. May 01, 2020  | Author: John Nye  | Published: May 01, 2020 

    At this moment in time, the world is in a very strange state: More than half the population of the US—and the world—has been asked or ordered to stay at home. By the time this article is published, it is likely this number will have grown even more. How does this affect security? In many ways, this crisis has caused a perfect storm for security to go spiraling out of control. First, consider the sheer number of people that were forced to begin working from home in 2020. A majority of the workforce in the US is now telecommuting. Add...

  16. Data protection frameworks shudder under the force of COVID-19

    Report on Supply Chain Compliance Volume 3, Number 9. April 30, 2020  | Author: Sascha Matuszak  | Published: April 30, 2020 

    Governments around the world have used access to troves of personal data to combat the spread of the COVID-19 virus,[1] and the governments that accessed the most data have had the greatest success against the virus. This trend has brought up discussions of data protection and privacy[2] and whether the intrusive measures used to keep people safe will remain in place after the threat passes...

  17. COVID-19 Legislative Surprise: Part 2 Rule Is Harmonized With HIPAA

    Report on Medicare Compliance Volume 29, Number 14. April 13, 2020  | Author: Theresa Defino  | Published: April 13, 2020 

    Over the years, HHS has revised the Confidentiality of Substance Use Disorder Patient Records regulation, doing as much as it could before it ran into the limits of the statute but never going as far as some people wanted, which is full alignment with HIPAA. Enter the COVID-19 pandemic relief legislative scramble and—voila—it happened. Yet that change has nothing to do with the pandemic, stemming instead from advocacy efforts by a family whose daughter died of an overdose because a new doctor prescribed her oxycodone not knowing she had previously been addicted to heroin...

  18. The coronavirus provides an opportunity to hone crisis response plans for the next big challenge

    Report on Supply Chain Compliance Volume 3, Number 4. February 20, 2020  | Author: Sascha Matuszak  | Published: February 20, 2020 

    The coronavirus that has, at the time of writing, infected more than 40,000 people around the world and killed more than 1,000,[1] is also ravaging international trade and global supply chains. Companies with manufacturing operations in China have shut down factories, told employees to stay home, pulled expat employees out of country and issued varying degrees of shutdown orders that could extend deep into February...

  19. Agencies Make Allowances for Impact of COVID-19 on Spending, Deadlines

    Report on Research Compliance Volume 17, Number 4. March 26, 2020  | Author: Theresa Defino  | Published: March 26, 2020 

    Time can seem both elastic and yet meaningless during a public health emergency like the one the world is experiencing now due to COVID-19. It is almost unbelievable to think that even a month or two ago, institutions—and the federal government—did not have this pandemic on their radar. Universities and others have often had to make difficult decisions without direction from the government (see story, p. 1).[1]...

  20. COVID-19 and long-term care: Best practices and lessons learned

    Compliance Today - June 2020  | Authors: Lester Perling, Jamie Gelfman  | Published: June 2020 

    In mid-February 2020, Life Care Center of Kirkland—a Life Care Centers of America skilled nursing facility located in Kirkland, Washington—experienced an increase in residents and staff members demonstrating symptoms of febrile respiratory illnesses.[1] After several of the residents were initially tested for influenza, one of the residents, a 73-year-old female resident with a history of coronary artery disease and other underlying conditions, was transported to the hospital as her respiratory symptoms deteriorated. Although the resident reported that she had not recently traveled nor been in any known contact with anyone with COVID-19, she ultimately tested positive and passed away on...

  21. United States Department of Justice addresses antitrust issues during COVID-19

    Compliance Today - June 2020  | Author: Sascha Matuszak  | Published: June 2020 

    The coronavirus epidemic is forcing organizations, especially those in the healthcare field, to collaborate in ways that could violate US antitrust regulations. To head off any violations before they can happen, and to clarify existing and ongoing regulations, the Antitrust Division of the Department of Justice and the Bureau of Competition of the Federal Trade Commission issued a joint statement[1] on the matter...

  22. Mitigating risks in prescribing and dispensing chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine for COVID-19

    Compliance Today - June 2020  | Authors: Sarah M. Hall, Steven A. Block, Jamar T. King  | Published: June 2020 

    During his March 19, 2020, press briefing,[1] President Donald Trump called chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine a “game changer” in the battle against COVID-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus that has caused a global pandemic. He went on to say, “It’s shown…very, very encouraging early results. And we’re going to be able to make that drug available almost immediately.” The next day on Twitter, he exclaimed that “it” [chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine] must “be put in use IMMEDIATELY.”[2]...

  23. With MA, Commercial Payer COVID-19 Changes, Hospitals Face New Payment Deliberations

    Report on Medicare Compliance Volume 29, Number 20. June 01, 2020  | Author: Nina Youngstrom  | Published: June 01, 2020 

    When hospitals and other providers bill Medicare Advantage (MA) plans and commercial payers for coronavirus tests, they’re supposed to be paid 100% of the negotiated rate or the default charge because the Families First Coronavirus Response Act,[1] as amended by the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, And Economic Security (CARES) Act,[2] prohibits patient cost sharing. But with so many payers and payment arrangements, something may get lost in translation, and hospitals may not realize they weren’t paid the full amount and overcharge patients...

  24. Hackers Exploit Pandemic With COVID-Specific Phishing; 'Humans Are the Weakest Link'

    Report on Medicare Compliance Volume 29, Number 15. April 20, 2020  | Author: Nina Youngstrom  | Published: April 20, 2020 

    When hordes of employees headed home to work as the coronavirus spread, there was a hospital surge of another kind: a sudden increase in the number of employees who needed laptops and/or licensing of software and training on how to use the technology. The potential for security lapses is greater, especially for employees who use home computers, at least temporarily...

  25. From Dorms to Tents, Hospitals Adapt for COVID-19; Some Patients Are Stuck

    Report on Medicare Compliance Volume 29, Number 18. May 11, 2020  | Author: Nina Youngstrom  | Published: May 11, 2020 

    The gyms and dorm rooms at Sonoma State University in California are an alternate care site for St. Joseph Health System in Santa Rosa and other health care organizations that have to be creative as they place patients with COVID-19 and “persons under investigation” for the coronavirus who have nowhere to safely isolate. There are so many variations, including patients who are medically safe for discharge from the hospital but may be turned away by skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) despite CMS’s blanket waiver of a three-day qualifying hospital stay,[1] and patients who are on methadone but can’t go out for...