Report on Supply Chain Compliance

  1. Canadian government introduces new privacy bill

    Report on Supply Chain Compliance Volume 3, Number 23. December 10, 2020  | Author: Sascha Matuszak  | December 10, 2020 

    The Canadian government introduced a bill into Parliament Nov. 17, the Digital Charter Implementation Act of 2020,[1] that makes a number of changes and clarifications to Canada’s existing data privacy regulatory framework. The bill would establish a new privacy law (the Consumer Privacy Protection Act) and create the Personal Information and Data Protection Tribunal. The Consumer Privacy Protection Act lays out the changes to existing law, while the Tribunal acts as an enforcer of the law and an interlocutor between private enterprise, the government and private citizens...

  2. Asian trade deal signed into law

    Report on Supply Chain Compliance Volume 3, Number 23. December 10, 2020  | Author: Sascha Matuszak  | December 10, 2020 

    The 15 partners to the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP) signed the agreement[1] Nov. 15, 2020, enacting the largest ever trade deal by population. The RCEP encompasses the 2.2 billion people of the 10 countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) plus Australia, China, Japan, New Zealand and South Korea...

  3. 'Speak-up' culture can keep problems from becoming violations

    Report on Supply Chain Compliance Volume 3, Number 23. December 10, 2020  | Author: Theresa Defino  | December 10, 2020 

    The complaint came in anonymously, recalled Joshua Toas, vice president of compliance at the State University of New York (SUNY) Research Foundation. “My manager harasses me, doesn’t let me do X, Y, and Z. It’s a violation of policy,” the person alleged. “Well, we have 17,000 employees, [and] that’s the extent of the complaint. I don’t know what campus you’re at, what location you’re at, what program you’re in,” said Toas. In this case, the person didn’t respond to follow-up questions, even though they were posed through a channel that would have allowed the employee to remain unidentified...

  4. UK Environmental Bill closer to being passed

    Report on Supply Chain Compliance Volume 3, Number 23. December 10, 2020  | Author: Sascha Matuszak  | December 10, 2020 

    The United Kingdom’s overhauled environmental legislation is a step closer to becoming law.[1] The Environment Bill was introduced in January 2020 to replace existing European Union policy frameworks after Brexit. The UK bill takes into account goals set out in the government’s 25 Year Environment Plan and creates a new enforcement body, the Office for Environmental Protection.[2]...

  5. Associated Press report finds rape, abuse in palm oil fields

    Report on Supply Chain Compliance Volume 3, Number 23. December 10, 2020  | Author: Sascha Matuszak  | December 10, 2020 

    In an article[1] published Nov. 24, 2020, reporters for the Associated Press detailed accounts from women working in palm oil fields of their experiences being abused, sexually assaulted and held against their will. Palm oil is a key ingredient in millions of products sold around the world:...

  6. Tariff news: China and the US; China and Australia

    Report on Supply Chain Compliance Volume 3, Number 23. December 10, 2020  | Author: Sascha Matuszak  | December 10, 2020 

    Trade conflicts between the United States and China and Australia and China received new fuel as China imposed more tariffs on certain Australian goods and the U.S. added tariffs to Chinese twist ties...

  7. Forced labor in fashion industry supply chain

    Report on Supply Chain Compliance Volume 3, Number 23. December 10, 2020  | Author: Sascha Matuszak  | December 10, 2020 

    An article in the BBC News[1] described forced labor conditions in South Asia—primarily south India—in supply chains linked to major global fashion brands such as Ralph Lauren and Marks & Spencer. The article interviewed women working in the industry, all of whom declined to name themselves in order to avoid repercussions, who detailed abuse and forced labor conditions at the hands of their employers...

  8. International statement calls for backdoor access into encrypted communications

    Report on Supply Chain Compliance Volume 3, Number 23. December 10, 2020  | Author: Sascha Matuszak  | December 10, 2020 

    Officials from the United Kingdom, United States, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, India and Japan released a statement[1] calling for big tech firms to allow government access into encrypted communications in the name of security. The push comes amid concerns that sex traffickers are able to use encrypted communications and, on the other side, that governments are using hot-button issues to gain even more access to their citizens’ private communications...

  9. China releases new export control law

    Report on Supply Chain Compliance Volume 3, Number 22. November 12, 2020  | Author: Sascha Matuszak  | November 12, 2020 

    China released a final draft of its new Export Control Law (ECL),[1] a sweeping piece of legislation that has many similarities with the United States’ Export Administration Regulations while also containing very important differences. The law was announced Oct. 17 and goes into effect Dec. 1...

  10. Turkish data protection authorities fine Twitter and Facebook

    Report on Supply Chain Compliance Volume 3, Number 22. November 12, 2020  | Author: Sascha Matuszak  | November 12, 2020 

    Turkish authorities recently fined[1] Twitter, Facebook and several other social media platforms for failing to appoint a country representative in accordance with Turkey’s Data Protection Law...

  11. ESG disclosures and the supply chain

    Report on Supply Chain Compliance Volume 3, Number 22. November 12, 2020  | Author: Karen Kroll  | November 12, 2020 

    With growing numbers of investors and customers incorporating environmental, social and governance (ESG) factors into their decision-making, many organizations will want to ensure they are, as well. That includes monitoring for issues within their supply chains, such as vendors skimping on safety standards...

  12. California passes amendments to CCPA

    Report on Supply Chain Compliance Volume 3, Number 22. November 12, 2020  | Author: Sascha Matuszak  | November 12, 2020 

    California passed Proposition 24, which made several changes and updates to the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). Amendments to the original language[1] of the law are extensive and include clarifications and changes to all the major privacy rights consumers enjoyed under the initial law. The amendments were submitted by Alastair Mactaggart on Nov. 13, 2019. Mactaggart also submitted a proposal to include data privacy on the state ballot in 2018, which resulted in the California legislature adopting the CCPA later that year...

  13. World Bank debars Berky GmbH in connection with corruption in Myanmar

    Report on Supply Chain Compliance Volume 3, Number 22. November 12, 2020  | Author: Sascha Matuszak  | November 12, 2020 

    The World Bank announced Nov. 4 a two-and-a-half-year debarment of Berky GmbH for alleged corrupt practices involving the Ayeyarwady Integrated River Basin Management Project in Myanmar. According to the news release,[1] Berky GmbH colluded to win the bid using a subsidiary and bribed officials with payments and trips to Europe...

  14. OFAC updates to Yemen, Cuba and Iran sanctions

    Report on Supply Chain Compliance Volume 3, Number 22. November 12, 2020  | Author: Sascha Matuszak  | November 12, 2020 

    The United States Department of the Treasury Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) issued amendments to sanctions frameworks imposed on Cuba and Yemen and issued a general license authorizing certain humanitarian transactions with Iran...

  15. USTR releases GSP updates

    Report on Supply Chain Compliance Volume 3, Number 22. November 12, 2020  | Author: Sascha Matuszak  | November 12, 2020 

    The United States Trade Representative (USTR) concluded several Generalized System of Preferences (GSP) eligibility reviews[1] and announced the results Oct. 30. The GSP provides tariff-free access to the U.S. market as long as certain conditions are met...

  16. USTR releases report on China trade progress

    Report on Supply Chain Compliance Volume 3, Number 22. November 12, 2020  | Author: Sascha Matuszak  | November 12, 2020 

    In an Oct. 23 news release,[1] the United States Trade Representative (USTR) announced details regarding the U.S.-China Phase One Economic and Trade Agreement. The agreement called for China to increase purchases of U.S. agricultural goods and implement 57 technical commitments. According to the USTR, China has implemented “at least 50” of the 57 commitments and has purchased more than USD 23 billion in agricultural goods, approximately 71% of its commitments under the Phase One agreement...

  17. China seeks to dominate green car market by 2035

    Report on Supply Chain Compliance Volume 3, Number 22. November 12, 2020  | Author: Sascha Matuszak  | November 12, 2020 

    The Chinese government announced an ambitious plan[1] to create a domestic green car supply chain by 2035. The plan calls for more than half of new vehicles sold in 2035 to be “new energy vehicles” connected to the internet. China is gearing up for long-term friction with the United States, and part of the solution is to transform its own automobile industry into a world power. China hopes to lead the way with innovations in batteries and drive systems...

  18. UK Information Commissioner's Office issues enforcement action against Experian

    Report on Supply Chain Compliance Volume 3, Number 22. November 12, 2020  | Author: Sascha Matuszak  | November 12, 2020 

    The United Kingdom Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) is requiring Experian to make major changes to how it processes personal data[1] in the UK. The action falls short of issuing a fine but does threaten fines if Experian fails to meet ICO demands after nine months. Experian has appealed the enforcement action. The requirements are stayed pending the appeal...

  19. A look at the EU Market Surveillance Regulation

    Report on Supply Chain Compliance Volume 3, Number 21. October 29, 2020  | Author: Sascha Matuszak  | October 29, 2020 

    The European Union has some of the world’s most robust environmental, health and safety standards[1] for products sold and imported into the market. Despite these strict regulations (e.g., Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals; Restriction of Hazardous Substances) member states often acted individually when investigating violations and enforcing compliance. The EU lacked a union-wide mechanism that could help member states work together to solve compliance-related problems more efficiently...

  20. Uniform rules are good for business

    Report on Supply Chain Compliance Volume 3, Number 21. October 29, 2020  | Author: Sascha Matuszak  | October 29, 2020 

    As the European Union’s regulatory landscape expands, member states cede some of their autonomy in order to serve the greater good. This has been a constant source of friction in the EU and is one of the primary reasons why the United Kingdom eventually withdrew from it.[1] It is often the case that regulations created in Brussels clash with local rules and regulations, which can lead to legislative overlap, confusion and uncertainty—something few companies wish for...

  21. US files antitrust complaint against Google

    Report on Supply Chain Compliance Volume 3, Number 21. October 29, 2020  | Author: Sascha Matuszak  | October 29, 2020 

    After more than a year of investigations, the United States Department of Justice filed an antitrust complaint[1] against Google LLC to prevent the company from “unlawfully maintaining monopolies in the markets for general search services, search advertising, and general search text advertising in the United States through anticompetitive and exclusionary practices, and to remedy the effects of this conduct.”...

  22. Purdue fined and forced to transform into public benefit company

    Report on Supply Chain Compliance Volume 3, Number 21. October 29, 2020  | Author: Sascha Matuszak  | October 29, 2020 

    The United States Department of Justice announced a plea deal[1] with Purdue Pharma LP and the Sackler family that includes billions in fines and an admission of criminal liability for misleading investigators and violating both the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and the federal Anti-Kickback Statute...

  23. US sanctions Nord Stream 2 pipeline

    Report on Supply Chain Compliance Volume 3, Number 21. October 29, 2020  | Author: Sascha Matuszak  | October 29, 2020 

    The U.S. Department of State released guidance[1] Oct. 20 regarding the new sanction regulations targeting a Russian natural gas pipeline, Nord Stream 2, that the U.S. claims harms its national interests and those of the European Union...

  24. Goldman Sachs settles investigation into 1MDB scandal with USD 2.8 billion payment

    Report on Supply Chain Compliance Volume 3, Number 21. October 29, 2020  | Author: Sascha Matuszak  | October 29, 2020 

    Goldman Sachs has agreed to pay a penalty of USD 2.2 billion[1] for its role in the robbing of 1Malaysia Development Berhad (1MDB), a Malaysian development fund meant to improve infrastructure and living standards for millions of Malaysians. The bank’s Asian offices, run by the chief executive David Solomon, helped sell billions in bonds for the fund. The bank also assisted in money laundering and bribed officials, including the former first lady of Malaysia. Some of Goldman Sachs employees also profited from the illicit deals and have been since charged in U.S. courts...

  25. Supply chain disruption in Africa

    Report on Supply Chain Compliance Volume 3, Number 21. October 29, 2020  | Author: Sascha Matuszak  | October 29, 2020 

    An article[1] in The Africa Logistics discusses the major issues companies and entities in the industrials, manufacturing and transportation (IMT) sectors are facing due to COVID-19-related restrictions and regulations. According to the article, the barriers put up across regional and national lines to stem the spread of the virus have led to bottlenecks, delays and shortages as supplies and products are unable to move across borders. Critically, supply chain disruptions in Europe and Asia have put a crimp in the flow of industrial machinery and transport equipment to Africa, causing further delays and shortages...